Life Hack – 100 yen store items

Transformation!
I must say, the 100 yen store belongs in the list of typical Japanese.
Incredible, how many different kind of things you are able to find there. From needles to notebooks, from cleaning sheets to brooms, from fake eyelashes to bicycle tools and so on.
And everything for 100 yen + 10 yen tax each! It is super cheap, useful and the quality is not bad too.

Divided in two parts, the first part is about some little items, which can be useful for other purposes. Maybe, it gives you more inspiration to come up with ideas of items of 100 yen store. The examples here are from Japanese people who posted in their own social media profile. Pretty awesome! The second part is about some items which are interesting and probably useful, but not what you would think getting one before finding them in the hyaku (100) yen store! That will be in the next post.

Let’s start with the tricks of certain 100 yen items!

If you need a hook next to the wash basin, toilet or kitchen counter to hang up the towels, 100 yen stores have plenty of those hooks. But some Japanese use them in a different way, which makes me consider to buy extra.

1.) Do you have a couple of glasses or sunglasses? How about displaying and storing them like this way. Hang up some of hooks!

 

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2.) I thought this is useful. In the summer either we use the air conditioner or the ventilator to cool down the rooms. Sometimes we store the ventilator, when we don’t use it, but we have the cord just randomly next to it, or entangled around the pole. This solution with hooks is great! Put 2 on the pole of the ventilator and entangle the cord vertically around the 2 hooks.


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3.)This is a combination of hooks and a phone ring holder. Attach a phone ring holder to the remote and hang a hook on the designated desirable place.

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4.) For stationary, papers, unused items, underwear, make-up, accessories etc., boxes and trays are useful. Instead of taking a box out of the main storage closet or rack, we can create a sliding shelves by pulling on hooks on boxes.

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5.) No place to store bananas safely, this is a solution: Use hooks and bananas are able to swing, without getting bumped by other products.

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Beside of the hooks, here are some other tricks with other items from the 100 yen store.

6.) These are actually cord clips to arrange cord wires, but it seems this user has stuck these on the mirror to hang toothbrushes. What I am the most convinced about this trick, it can drain and dry nicely. Some of those toothbrush

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7.) Are you good with hands and like to make things too. This rack is created with 3 items from the 100 yen store: metal racks (2x), wooden plates (3x) and chopsticks, It is not only useful but it looks pretty nice too.

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8.) With the same metal racks, you can also use them to hang the garbage bags.

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9.) For your precious clothing which can easily wrinkle, this is a good idea to store a certain shirt neatly. Just put it in a 100 yen plastic file case, with a matching tie or accessories. Also super easy!

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10.) Last interesting usage of a 100 yen item, magnet!
Difficulties finding your nail clipper, tweezers, metal clips, pins? Stuck them on magnets.

   

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Some useful ideas? Anyway, quite funny to see some people seriously doing these kind of tricks. Have you been using a 100 yen store item for a different purpose?

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Life Hack – Different brands of Laundry products

Last time we distinguished different products which are useful for cleaning the clothes, keeping the clothes in good condition and making it easier. For example, the dry sheets which avoid molds and stains on clothes, sheets and futons.

As an expat it is difficult to know which detergent is for what purpose. Also, it is sometimes annoying to use google translation every time and you just take the risk buying one pack of detergent, without knowing what it actually is. I made once a mistake by buying a clothing deodorizer, I actually wanted a laundry cleaning detergent. It is useful to know which bottles and laundry brands are laundry detergents, softeners or deodorizers. This time, it is about different brands of typical laundry cleaning detergents which you can easily find in drugstores in Tokyo. So smaller chance of buying a deodorizer again, bigger chance to find the laundry detergent.

To help out kanji-challenged expats in Japan (like me), here is a  summary of the most useful laundry detergent products in Japan. There might be different brands in various drugstores, but these products (of different brands) are common here. Hopefully it is useful and easy to understand, since translation camera apps are not always doing their job properly.

The products are explained as:

  • Original Japanese name
  • English name
  • Japanese pronunciation / Japanese name in Roman
  • Function
  • Instruction

Enjoy shopping and doing laundry!

Laundry brand products Japan1 Laundry brand products Japan

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Life Hack – Clothing products

This time, a list of products related to clothing, but probably, it would also be useful to know which bottles and brands are cleaning detergents, softeners or deodorizers. I made once a mistake by buying a deodorizer, but I actually wanted a laundry cleaning detergent. So next time, we will specify the laundry products. 

For now, a list of useful clothing related drugstore products. We distinguish different products which are useful for cleaning the clothes, keeping the clothes in good condition and making it easier. For example, in the summer, we need to be careful about molds, so in Japan there are dry sheets which avoid molds and stains on clothes, sheets and futons.  Or there is a convenient spray to smooth the clothes during ironing. These kind of convenient products are listed up here.

To help out kanji-challenged expats in Japan (like me), here is a  summary of the most useful laundry products in Japan. There might be different brands in various drugstores, but these products (of different brands) are common here. Hopefully it is useful and easy to understand, since translation camera apps are not always doing their job properly.

The products are explained as:

  • Original Japanese name
  • English name
  • Japanese pronunciation / Japanese name in Roman
  • Function
  • Instruction

Enjoy shopping!

Laundry Detergent in Japan

Laundry detergent in Japan

 

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Life Hack – Pesticides

As a North European, I haven’t experienced a lot of bugs at home, but since I have moved to Japan, I have come across my first cockroach and my first big rat. In the summer, my whole body needs to be covered with a sprayed layer of insecticide to prevent getting hundreds of mosquito bites.

It was quite new to me, to buy pesticides. The best way is to ask a staff of the drugstore, but if speaking is problematic as well, hmmm…. It might be useful to know about the pesticides in Japan.

To help out kanji-challenged expats in Japan (like me), here is a  summary of the most useful pesticides in Japan. There might be different brands in various drugstores, but these products (of different brands) are common here. Hopefully it is useful and easy to understand, since translation camera apps are not always doing their job properly.

The products are explained as:

  • Original Japanese name
  • English name
  • Japanese pronunciation / Japanese name in Roman
  • Function
  • Instruction

Enjoy shopping!

Pesticides 1
Pesticides 1
Pesticides 2
Pesticides 2

 

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Tulip Self Quarantine Service

Great news, the Japanese government has allowed more foreign students to enter Japan since the beginning of November.
However, these students need to quarantine for 10 days in Japan before they are really allowed to go out in Japan. Not only for international new students, but any female foreigner who is searching for an accommodation which is also allowed to quarantine the first 10 days, we provide the self quarantine service in our share houses!

Self Quarantine Tulip Service

Arriving at Narita Airport:

1.)
Book a seat for a Keisei train ride from Narita airport to Ueno station in Tokyo beforehand.  Currently, it is 4,500 yen per person to book a seat in this train and a parking spot in Ueno.

Please check for more information in Keisei Travel website:  https://keiseitravel.co.jp/wp/en/blog/oneday_tour/7060/

2.)
If you are planning to stay in our Tulip share house, we will pick you up by car at your booked parking spot in Ueno. It is demanded from the Japanese government to be transported by private car or corona taxi. Our car service is
just 4,000 yen.

3.)
Tulip will prepare garbage bags, masks and sanitizer in the room of the new international resident. If the resident requests for more, it is negotiable.

4.)
Tulip is able to buy the grocery from the new resident twice in 10 days and the first and the second time of grocery deliveries cost 1,500 yen per time. The grocery list needs to be emailed to Tulip and the cost of the grocery shopping items needs to be paid back by the resident.
The third time of grocery delivery will be 5,000 yen.

5.)
Tulip will guide you about the quarantine rules in the share house, like the usage of the common bathrooms which need to be used by current residents as well.

For more information about this service, please contact us
contact@tulip-e.com

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Tulip Staff Introduction II

Hi, this is Yuka and I have worked at Tulip for more than half a year, but I hadn’t introduced myself yet. This blog is about me, my home country the Netherlands and my experience in Tokyo.

I was born and raised in Amsterdam, the capital city of the Netherlands. My parents decided to live in the Netherlands a long time ago, because they really fell in love for this country when they were in their twenties. Even though they like to live there, I decided to move to Japan. In 2010 I had the opportunity to do an exchange program in Tokyo and since then I have liked Japan a lot. I haven’t always lived in the Netherlands since I had started my bachelor study, I was going somewhere else to get more experience in architecture. Because of my nomadic lifestyle, I have started to see how great the Netherlands is. I didn’t understand why people like to visit the Netherlands, but now I do understand!

Windmills and tulips in the country side of the Netherlands (Photo Credit)

The Netherlands is a very small country in Europe, close to Germany and Belgium. The size is about the size of the island Kyushu in Japan. Probably, people know this country as the country of tulips, and windmills. We indeed have windmills and tulips, but generally speaking you won’t see them in the main cities of the Netherlands. So, what is the Netherlands beside of the suburban iconic elements? You might know, it is the country of the tallest people on earth, the LGBT rights are the most progressive in the world, a flat landscape which is 70% below the sea level and the country of legalized soft drug law.

Amsterdam canals, Amsterdam houses and house boats (Photo Credit)

The Netherlands is well known of the brick Canal houses along the canals. Normally, they are about six-stories high, have quite big windows and steep stairs, and lean a bit to the front. The relationship between the buildings and the canals are potential urban elements what I miss a lot. A lot of Dutch cities have chill public spots between the buildings, for example big plazas with terraces around (good places to have a cold orange juice or beer in the sun) and canals to sit on the side and stare to the boats. There are even cafes and restaurants along the canals; Beautiful, cozy and enjoyable. The country of water!

Terraces along the canals (Photo Credit)

Since a big part of the country is below sea level, water is the weakest and the strongest element in this country. Since ages ago, Dutch people have fought against water; high dunes, dikes and other water systems were created. Even the wind mills are water systems, you will notice that the most of wind wills are next to the water. They also appreciate water by creating a lot of canals, lakes and water leisure parks. Also, the Dutch team during Olympic Games is strong at water related sports, for example Swimming, Ice skating, Beach volleyball and Sailing. But probably the Dutch people are mostly proud of their high-skilled water technology and innovative water ideas. Dutch companies are often been asked by other countries for tsunami disasters, rising water level and drink water.

There are so many other Dutch characteristics, cheese, cows and milk, the direct and open communication, an orange colored festival, famous painters etc.

Beside of explaining about the Netherlands, I would like to tell a bit about my experience in Tokyo. In Tokyo, I like Aoyama, Yanaka and Kagurazaka. Since, we have two houses around Kagurazaka, which are Happy House Kagurazaka and Chilli Pepper & Cream, I will tell a bit more about Kagurazaka.

Kanda river in Kagurazaka during cherry blossom period (Photo Credit)

When I am planning to visit this area, it is mostly because I am going to meet someone to eat in one of its restaurants or cafes, to visit the Akagi shrine or to visit my friend’s contemporary art gallery when there is a new exhibition. The restaurants are very nice, I enjoy eating Japanese food and French food in this area. I recommend Rito Kitchen, a beach house restaurant where they serve meals cooked with products of the small islands of Japan. For French, I really enjoyed the food in the very popular restaurant Maison de la Bourgogne. If you go to the canal side, there is Canal café, maybe because I come from a canal country、I like to sit there with a cup of tea staring to the big canal. During spring sakura time, along the canal it is a popular spot to enjoy Hanami (picnic under the cherry blossom trees). Along the canal you have big cherry blossom trees.

 

 

 

 

Rito Kitchen in Kaguraka (Photo Credit)

I like architecture and Akagi Shrine in Kagurazaka is renovated by a current famous Japanese architect, therefore I like to go there for my prayers. The same architect also renovated an old book warehouse in Kagurazaka. It called La Kagu and it is currently an event space with shops and a restaurant.

La Kagu, an old book warehouse to an event space with shops, exhibitions and restaurant (Photo Credit)

Still many things to explore in this area and other places in Tokyo. Even though I have come to Tokyo so many times and have lived here for 2 years now. For more information about our two houses in Kagurazaka area, check our website.

Happy House Kagurazaka: https://tulip-e.com/en/estateinfo/27/

Chilli Pepper & Cream: https://tulip-e.com/en/estateinfo/30/