Sakura Season 2020

It is not the brightest and the most romantic moment right now in 2020, the corona virus is still spreading and it hasn’t been decreased. You might probably know a lot of entertainment facilities are closed and a lot of events are canceled. End of March is almost coming, which means the cherry blossoms will full bloom soon. The governor of Tokyo, Yuriko Koike warns people, hanami (picnic under the cherry blossoms) is still a risky activity in this situation. She asks people to refrain doing picnic and having parties in parks. Although, she doesn’t want to stop people enjoying cherry blossoms, she said on March 12th: “We discussed what to do with hanami. It is open-air, therefore we still want people to admire flowers.”

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Even though, hanami is very fun and it is a tradition in Japan, it is better to listen to the governor of Japan. But how and where can we enjoy sakura (cherry blossom) this year? It is better to go to small local parks in the residential areas instead of the popular big public parks, where a lot of people (locals and tourists) come. Before going to the list of suggestions. Here is the list of sakura festivals which are canceled:

Ueno Sakura festival 2020
Chiyoda Sakura festival 2020
Nakameguro Sakura festival 2020 (along the river)
Shibuya Sakuragaoka Sakura festival 2020
Bunkyo Sakura festival 2020
Jiyugaoka Sakura festival 2020
Sa*kaso Sakura festival 2020 in Asukayama park
Koganei Sakura festival 2020
Sumida Koen Sakura festival 2020

In other small places, there are no festivals hold, but they are still nice to walk around or sit there. According to the cherry blossom forecast, the blossoms have started blooming in Tokyo on March 14th. The best moment is around March 27th. Probably in the weekend of March 28th and 29th you can enjoy the beautiful scenario.

For Happy House Mint and Witt-Style Clover
Two big parks in Nerima ward with a lot of cherry blossoms. Hikarigaoka Park and Toshimaen Park in Nerima ward.

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For Happy House Koenji and Happy House Kamikitazawa
A popular spot for locals and less for tourists, it is the Wadabori park in Suginami ward. Big cherry blossom trees along the Zenpukuji river.

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For Happy House Orange, Vitamin Color and Asian
Nakano has a lot of Cherry Blossoms and not specifically in parks. Nakano dori is full of cherry blossoms.

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For Witt-Style Nakameguro and Witt-Style Mishuku
One of the most popular spot to see sakura is in Nakameguro, along the Nakameguro river. It might be less busy compare to the previous years, but probably it is better to skip to go there for this year. In Setagaya ward, there is a park called Kinuta Park, which has about 930 cherry blossoms blooming.

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For Happy House Kagurazaka & Chilli Pepper and Cream
PersonallyI went to Iidabashi area for hanami last year, it was not super crowded along the Kanda river, so probably there won’t be many people walking this year. It is beautiful though.


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How to prepare for an earthquake?!


Regularly, we feel a small earthquake in Tokyo. It is quite common here, but it has been predicted that there will occur a big one in Tokyo before the year 2050. For foreigners who haven’t experienced any earthquakes, it can be frightening. How to prepare for any kind of earthquake?

 

1.)Install this useful app Yurekuru on your phone. It gives warning notifications a few seconds before an earthquakes happens.

2.)  On the website of Japan Meteorological Agency, you can find out about the latest Japanese earthquakes. It updates immediately after any earthquake. It is good to know where the main core was, in the case you would like to escape to other cities.

(link: https://www.keishicho.metro.tokyo.jp/multilingual/english/natural_disasters/respond_to_eq/index.files/english.pdf)

3.)  Discuss with other girls in your sharehouse, about a safe place outside, if the sharehouse is not safe to be in after an earthquake. At least you wouldn’t be alone outside after the disaster.

4.)  Let the embassy of your country know you are living in Japan by registering your contact information. The embassy can assist you more before, during and after the earthquake. In my experience of the earthquake in 2011, the Dutch embassy contacted the Dutch people who had lived in Japan, that the embassy could arrange airplane tickets from Japan to the Netherlands for free.

(link: https://www.keishicho.metro.tokyo.jp/multilingual/english/natural_disasters/respond_to_eq/index.files/english.pdf)

5.)  Make your house dangerous free. So check if the bookcase is standing against the wall and if certain breakable items are not on the top of a furniture. If necessary, you can tape certain cabinets or closets on the floor, just in case.

(link: https://www.keishicho.metro.tokyo.jp/multilingual/english/natural_disasters/respond_to_eq/index.files/english.pdf)

6.)  Prepare an emergency kit. You can buy those kits in Don Quijote, Amazon.com, home good stores and home centers. Or you can prepare an emergency kit by yourself.
What kind of items are useful to have before the earthquake:

  • A couple bottles of water
  • Flashlight + spare of batteries
  • Mobile phone charger
  • Cash
  • Medication
  • Radio + spare of batteries
  • Canned food and other ready-to-eat food
  • Work gloves
  • Big plastic sheets, like garbage bags or poncho
  • Copy of all your important documents, health insurance, bank information, passport etc.
  • Whistle
  • Swiss army knife
  • Pen + paper

(link: https://www.keishicho.metro.tokyo.jp/multilingual/english/natural_disasters/respond_to_eq/index.files/english.pdf)

 

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Aoyama Girls Night Out – Tulip Team Style!

Omotesando’s more down-to-earth neighbor and Harajuku’s more sophisticated older sister; Aoyama is a place to refresh, get inspired and feel fancy. So it only makes sense that our staff decided to make it our go-to destination for a girls night out – Tulip style!

There is a certain air to Aoyama that gives it an exclusive feel, perhaps because it is tucked away in the hilly slopes of Tokyo, but the small streets do not feel too narrow. Or maybe it’s the effortlessly fashionable artists and designers that can be overheard talking about their up and coming projects in passing. The tiny, boutique shops and local bars’ dedication to their craft to produce top-notch quality and protect the artisan culture, or maybe it is the eclectic architecture that somehow the groups of tourists have not yet discovered.

Heading over to dinner, we passed by Sunny Hills, designed by one of Tokyo’s most beloved modern architects, Kengo Kuma. Fans of Kuma’s work should definitely check out his many projects scattered around Kagurazaka, where we also happen to have two lovely share houses, Chilli Pepper & Cream and Happy House Kagurazaka.

As we approached the restaurant, we were taken aback at the gorgeous exterior and atmosphere. Walking through the bar area (and slightly regretting our outfit choices), we were shown to a table seated by a lit-up terrace. 

Cicada is located just a minute’s walk from Omotesando Station and specializes in modern Mediterranean cuisine. The space itself has a Euro-chic atmosphere but the flavor of the dishes were deliciously authentic. We started with some toasted pita accompanied by various dips of your choice – we went with the classic hummus and a carrot, yogurt, & mint spread.

The cocktail menu was very impressive, which is expected as the restaurant is owned by Tysons & Company, the founders of T.Y. Harbor Brewery.

After our lots of chatting, laughs and “kanpais!” we scoped around the area for a place to grab some cocktails. We stumbled upon Radio Bar and were intrigued by its retro atmosphere, like something out of an old Japanese movie. It turned out that Radio Bar has been around since the 1970s, and THE place to go for cocktail connoisseurs and aspiring mixologists to enjoy a proper pour (which is hard to come across in Tokyo nowadays amongst all the Lemon Sours and Whiskey High Balls).

Accompanied with an incredibly delicious spread of fresh fruits and cheese came Bar Radio’s original cocktails served with impeccable presentation. Each cocktail has been meticulously crafted and perfected over the decades and we appreciated the attention to detail until the last very last drop. Because of the high standards of the establishment, the cocktails are not at all cheap and be prepared to be on your best behavior, that also means to dress accordingly!

Satisfied and slightly emotional over how exquisite our night has been so far, we were not ready for it to end. We decided to check out the nearby Commune 2nd, suggested by our staff Jan who is in the know about many Tokyo’s hidden gems.

At Commune 2nd, you will be greeted with hip, neon clad signs, beer and food stands with a modern-style food truck-like layout, and groups of merry making locals and foreigners alike enjoying themselves over drinks and food.

Commune 2nd closes at 10 PM, let’s clarify that all the shops and eating spaces close at 10 PM sharp! We had too much fun in the lively atmosphere and did not want to leave, but had to take a team pic while we were getting kicked out.

Although at first a bit intimidated and unfamiliar with the Aoyama area, it has become one of our favorite places to explore. Stay tuned for hopefully an Aoyama Part 2 Guide by the Tulip Team and also a possible share house that will be newly opening up  in Aoyama some time in the future 😉

Thanks for reading and enjoy Tokyo to the fullest! Tulip Real Estate specializes in female-only share houses in Tokyo. Send us a message to ask about our share houses and we are more than happy to recommended our favorite places to check out nearby.

Tulip Website: www.tulip-e.com

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Tokyo Day Trip: The Tulip Guide to Enoshima and Kamakura

Tokyo Day Trip: Kamakura Hase Temple

So you’ve been up and down the Skytree, shopped your heart out in Shinjuku, have an album of photos from the Shinjuku Gyoen in all four seasons, and are itching to discover a different side of Japan… buttttt hard-pressed for time. May we suggest a day-trip to the neighboring Kanagawa Prefecture with its gorgeous coastlines and unique slice of history? If so, read on for the low down to an easy-breezy inexpensive day trip to to the beautiful island town of Enoshima and the historic temple city of Kamakura!

Tokyo Day Trip: Eoshima Kamakura Enoden

1. Enoshima-Kamakura Free Pass

First things first, transport. We highly recommend purchasing the Odakyu Line Enoshima-Kamakura Free Pass. The one-day pass includes one round trip from your departure station to Fuijisawa, unlimited hop-on and offs on the Enoden Line between Fujisawa all the way to Kamakura, and discounts to a few attractions. The pass is available at the Odakyu Sightseeing Service Center in Shinjuku or at any Odakyu Line station ticket machines.

Enoshima-Kamakura Free Pass 江の島・鎌倉フリーパス
Price: 1,470 yen (From Shinjuku Station)
See here for a guide on how to buy from the ticket machines.

2. Katase Nishihama

ENoshima Kamakura Guide 1

Hop off at Katase-Enoshima Station and make your way over to the Katase Nishihama Beach for some of the closest beaches to Tokyo and an amazing, unobstructed view of Mount Fuji! Popular with surfers, the beach is also the scene of a number of parties in the warm summer months. From there, take a 20min walk across the ocean via the connecting bridge to Enoshima Island.

Katase Nishihama Beach 片瀬西浜
3 Chome Katasekaigan, Fujisawa, Kanagawa Prefecture 251-0035
〒251-0035 神奈川県藤沢市片瀬海岸3丁目

3. Enoshima Jinja

Tokyo Day Trip: Enoshima Jinja

Sitting on Enoshima Island is the Enoshima Jinja, one of the nation’s Three Great Shrines dedicated to the Benzaiten (弁才天) goddess of art and fortune. Legend has it that this particular Benten shared a love story with a five-headed dragon, hence the many dragons decked out on the grounds. The Enoshima Jinja is also home to three goddess and their respective shrines – Hetsunomiya, Nakatsunomiya, and Okutsunomiya (from lowest to highest). Psst! Tulip Tip: the stairs aren’t as daunting as they seem! Stretch your legs and save some cash by skipping the escalator and hiking up to the top. It’s a charming 15-20 min walk from the bottom shrine with lovely views of the island town and its coasts.

Enoshima Jinja 江ノ島神社
2-3-8 Enoshima, Fujisawa City, Kanagawa 251-0036
〒251-0036 神奈川県藤沢市江の島2丁目3番8号

4. Lovers’ Hill / Ryuren Bell of Love

Taking the trip with your significant other? Follow the signs off the main path and make your way over to the Lovers’ Bell. Ring the bell, make a wish, and attach your lock onto the fence with the many others to enjoy eternal love. Purchase a lock at the shops on the way to the entrance, or opt to bring your own! Singles, feel free to skip this attraction and head on over to the Iwaya Caves and Chigogafuchi Abyss.

Lover’s Hill / Ryuren Bell of Love 恋人の丘「龍恋の鐘」
2-5 Enoshima Ryunogaoka Natural Forest, Fujisawa City, Kanagawa 251-0036
〒251-0036 神奈川県藤沢市江の島2-5江の島龍野ヶ岡自然の森内

5. Iwaya Caves and Chigogafuchi Abyss

Nestled on the wesern end of Enoshima Island are the Iwaya Caves and the Chigogafuchi Abyss. Previous buddhist monk training ground in the Nara era, the Iwaya Caves consists of two natural caves-turned-shrines housing relics and statues from Enoshima’s past. While the caves are not much to write home about, the walkway to the caves overlooks the Chicgogafuchi Abyss, boasting gorgeous coastal views of crashing waves alongside a breathtaking view of Mt. Fuji. Heads up, the area is subject to very strong winds so we highly suggest extra precaution when climbing up and down the boulders to avoid being blown away!

Chigogafuchi Abyss 稚児ヶ淵
2-5-2 Enoshima, Fujisawa City, Kanagawa 251-0036
〒251-0036 神奈川県 藤沢市 江の島 2丁目5番2号

Tokyo Day Trip: The Great Buddha of Kamakura / Kamakura Daibutsu

6. The Great Buddha of Kamakura / Kamakura Daibutsu

Next up on the itinerary is Kamakura, oozing of traditional architecture with its many Buddhist temples and Shinto shrines. And what’s a visit to Kamakura without paying respects to the iconic Kamakura Daibutsu (Great Buddha)! A designated kokuhō 国宝 or National Treasure culture heritage site, this particular Daibutsu is vying for a spot on UNESCO’S list of World Heritage Sites, making it a must-see for culture-lovers. To get there from Enoshima Island, walk or hop on a bus to Enoshima Station, take the Enoden Line heading towards Kamakura to Hase Station, and follow the signs for Kōtoku-in.

Kamakura Daibutsu 鎌倉大仏
4-2-28 Hase, Kamakura, Kanagawa 248-0016
〒248-0016 神奈川県鎌倉市長谷4丁目2番28号

Price: 200 yen entry and an additional 20 yen to get inside the Daibutsu.

7. Komachi Street / Komachidori

Beginning from the round-about outside of Kamakura Station, and leading right up to the Tsurugaoka Hachimangū is the Komachidori Street. Legend has it that it began as an outdoor market held in front of the shrine. Today, more than 250 restaurants, cafes, and boutiques selling traditional gifts and sweets line the bustling street. It’s the perfect place to do a spot of souvenir shopping enroute to our final destination at the Hachimangū!

Kamakura Komachidori 鎌倉 小町通り
Komachi, Kamakura, Kanagawa 248-0006
〒248-0006 神奈川県鎌倉市小町

Tokyo Day Trip: Kamakura Tsurugaoka Hachimangu Shrine

8. Tsurugaoka Hachimangū

The most proninent of Kamakura’s Shinto shrines, the Tsurugaoka Hachimangū is located both geographical and culturally in the city center.  After defeating rival Taira clan in 1180, Kamakura Shogunate founder Yoritomo Minamoto established Kamakura as the nation’s defacto capital and built the shrine as a tribute the Hachiman (八幡神), Japanese god of war and archery. Today, the shrine houses two ponds representing rival clans Minamoto and Taira (Tiny Trivia: the Taira pond has four islands, as “four” holds the same pronunciation as “death” in Japanese), a peony garden, and a small museum. It’s also among the nation’s most popular shrines for hatsumode (初詣), with record breaking visitor numbers of over two million!

Tsurugaoka Hachimangū 鶴岡八幡宮
2-1-31 Yukinoshita, Kamakura, Kanagawa 248-8588
〒248-8588 神奈川県鎌倉市雪ノ下2-1-31

Not up for a day trip or a lengthy train ride?  Check out our Ultimate Nakano Guide for a low key yet fun-filled afternoon right in the heart of suburban Tokyo!

Follow us on social media!  🌷
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By: Lydia Hon

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Part Time Job Opportunity at Share House Company, Tokyo

Hi! We’re Tulip Real Estate, a small female-only share house management company in Nerima, Tokyo. We’re looking to grow our international team and we welcome women from all over the world.

Varied and Exciting Work
The work is very varied. You meet new people all the time and you will never be bored. Responsibilities range from usual duties like viewings, paper work, replying to inquiries etc., but also marketing, copywriting, updating social media, cleaning, stocking and decorating. We need someone flexible who also enjoys travelling to different locations within Tokyo.

We Want Your Ideas!
If you are creative and brimming with ideas, Tulip Real Estate is the part time opportunity for you!

As a small company, everyone’s ideas get listened to; you will be an important and valued part of the team. Our International Team members have the freedom to pursue their own projects for marketing or to improve the houses.

The work environment is casual and there is no dress code. However the work is also challenging and sometimes there are time restraints. Therefore we need someone who can take responsibility and manage their own time.

Gain Great Experience and Japanese Language Skills
You will be involved in all aspects of the business, meaning it is the perfect opportunity for those who want to learn about and gain experience in real estate; particularly share house and guest house management.

This is also a great chance to improve on Japanese skills and experience working in a Japanese business environment.

We are flexible when it comes to discussing work hours and days so students are welcome!

Hear From Our Current Staff!

Jess, UK:My Japanese has improved so much since I started working at Tulip. I’ve learnt so many words that I wouldn’t otherwise encounter and can now use them with confidence when communicating with colleagues.

I’ve also had the chance to explore many parts of Tokyo that aren’t well known and had the chance to share this knowledge with others through Tulip’s blogs and social media. I love meeting other people living in Japan, there’s always the chance to have an interesting chat and make a new friend.

Sometimes rushing around Tokyo to meet a client after another appointment overran is tough, but if you enjoy challenging and varied work with the chance to meet lots of new people, you will enjoy this job for sure!

Jan, Thailand:I like having the freedom to throw in my ideas and make use of my creative skills as a designer. I’m currently a student so I enjoy having flexible work hours and a casual office environment, where I can come to work wearing whatever I feel like!

My favourite part of the job is introducing Tokyo to newcomers and giving them all the tips and knowledge I’ve learnt by working here over the years. 

It’s fun to have the chance to get out of the office and travel around Tokyo for appointments, but this physicality can be tough. If you are the kind of person who is active and enjoys travelling, this opportunity is perfect!

Naomi, USA:It’s very rewarding to help those moving to Japan for the first time. Sometimes we are the very first people they meet after they land!

Adapting to Japanese work culture was a challenge but I’ve gained so much experience and greatly improved my cultural competence.

 

Requirements:
Fluent in English
Basic Japanese skills
Very organized and can manage own time
Can work independently as well as a team
Visa that allows working in Japan (with at least one year left)
Able to travel by train and bicycle to various locations in Tokyo

Desired Skills:
Creative skills
Familiar with social media
Good written English (for blogs and social media posts as well as copywriting)
Any other languages spoken will be considered a plus

➔ No dress code
➔ Travel expenses reimbursed (up to 10,000 yen per month)
➔ Flexible work schedule
➔ Possibility of a full time position in the future

If you are interested, send a resume and cover letter to n-mizutani@tulip-e.com

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Tokyo’s Hidden Gems: Sangubashi’s Park Life

Sangubashi is a charming, hidden suburb nestled between the tourist hotspots of Shinjuku, Harajuku and Shibuya. Its great location has lead it to become a popular residential area with Japanese and non-Japanese alike. Judging by the flash cars crawling down the busy shopping street and tiny dogs in designer wear, you can guess that the local inhabitants are pretty well off.

If you’re looking for a place to live or just a short term visit, Sangubashi has overflowing appeal. These are our top picks for things to see, do and, most importantly, eat.

Yoyogi Park

The charms of living in Sangubashi are obvious from one quick look at the map. The giant, green blob that has gobbled up the whole area from Yoyogi to Shibuya is Yoyogi Park. Massively famous, this grassy sprawl offers a place for Tokyoites to just chill, while watching sparkling fountains in the summer sun. At the weekend you can be entertained by the street performers lining the path. Fashion hub Harajuku can be reached by a pleasant walk to the other side of the park.

 

Meiji Jingu

Although it is not Japan’s most eminent shrine, Meiji Jingu is arguably the most famous one, with most tourists at least making the effort to pop in. Coming in from the Harajuku entrance, visitors take the sudden plunge into a spiritual nature walk with towering trees blocking out any trace of the Youth-culture capital outside the shrine’s walls. Coming from Sangubashi you can take the little-known back entrance, avoiding the crowds… initially at least. If you’re feeling a bit run down, check out Kiyomasa’s Well, a ‘power spot’. Japanese people believe you can get a bit of extra energy from visiting such places. It’s worth a try right?

If all this sightseeing works up an appetite, hop over the road from the Sangubashi exit of Yogogi Park. Park Arms is an American style restaurant that sells all manner of hamburgers as well as formidably sized sandwiches. Even better than the food is the fact that dogs are welcome to sit in with their owners, so there’s plenty of cute pups to fawn over while waiting for your meal to arrive.

Teppanyaki Restaurant En

This restaurant seems to be always busy, the raucous laughter of merry-makers is audible from outside most evenings. If you’re in the mood for affordable slabs of okonomiyaki and monja-yaki with various toppings available you’re in luck, but we recommend you make a reservation in advance.

Two words: cheese naan. This Nepalese restaurant offers inexpensive set meals at any time of the day, choose your curry from an extensive list and it comes with salad and your choice of rice or naan. For a few extra yen you can make your naan cheese or garlic, and we really advise you to do so.

 

All-nighter

It’s not unusual to see unfortunate salary men who missed the last train home sleeping rough in an array of strange locations. Luckily, if you’re staying in Sangubashi you can party all night in Shinjuku, Harajuku or Shibuya and walk home. Or even jump in a taxi without breaking the bank. There’s all night arcades, karaoke, restaurants, the fun never ends. Shibuya has many 300 yen per drink establishments popular with locals as well as travellers. You can easily forget all about that last train, without ending up asleep on a park bench.

 

Want to live in or visit Sangubashi? We have a share house there that also accepts short terms stays through AirBnB.

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