Eat Like a Local: Japanese Halal Restaurants in Tokyo

If you have a dietary restriction, eating out in a foreign country can feel really unfair. You want to be able to try everything and eat like the locals do. Food is such a massive part of a country’s culture you can feel as though you’re missing out.

Luckily for Muslim visitors and residents in Tokyo, you can sample plenty of ‘Washoku’ (traditional Japanese dishes) as well as Japan’s other famous dishes in restaurants that are completely Halal. Here’s a guide to must-try foods for Japanese cuisine beginners, complete with links to Muslim-friendly restaurants.

Washoku

Washoku is traditional Japanese cuisine, characterised by light dishes with subtle, refreshing flavours that are packed with seasonal ingredients and use rice as a base food.

Yoshiya (Shinjuku)

 

Ramen

A typical comfort dish of soupy, noodly goodness. Japanese people eat it to regain their strength after a tiring night and now you can too! Honolu  even serve sides of Halal gyoza which will definitely help you get your genki-ness back!

Honolu (Ebisu, Hamamatsucho, Shinbashi)

 

Soba

Another noodle dish, soba is a bit like ramen’s healthier cousin, buckwheat noodles swimming in a light broth. It can also be eaten cold with a dipping sauce. Yoshitomoan offers Halal options for all your soba needs.

Yoshitomoan (Kagurazaka)

 

Sushi

A classic. If you like your fish uncooked and lying on top of a little vinegared rice bed, you are in for a treat.

Sushi Ken (Asakusa)

 

Yakiniku

Yakiniku literally means grilled meat. Based on Korean barbeques, this Japanese favourite involves ordering raw meat to cook yourselves on a grill in the middle of your table. 10/10 for fun, 10/10 for socialness, 10/10 for deliciousness. (But it can be pricey!)

Gyumon (Shibuya)
Sumiyakiya (Roppongi)

 

Shabu Shabu

Like yakiniku, shabu shabu has the do-it-yourself fun factor. You swish the meat around in boiling broth until cooked. This restaurant is pretty expensive due to the meat being Wa-gyu (premium Japanese beef) so don’t go unless you’ve got those yens to spare.

Hanasakaji San (Shibuya)

 

Bento

Bento are a staple of Japanese culture. People take great care making bento (lunch boxes) for their partners and children, to show love and get them through the work/school day. This website delivers bento to your door, what’s more caring and heart-felt than that?

Taste and Discover Japan (Order Online)

 

This is of course, not an exhaustive list. Please give your own recommendations in the comments!

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